MEET THE PRESS: Claudia m. Watts

An interview with Washington Informer Bridge Editor Claudia Watts is a study in how to appreciate someone who — because they understand the value of words — curates her sentences to celebrate how they see modern journalism as an existentialist art showcase.
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An interview with Washington Informer Bridge Editor Claudia Watts is a study in how to appreciate someone who — because they understand the value of words — curates her sentences to celebrate how they see modern journalism as an existentialist art showcase.

The native of Baltimore County, Maryland, and Howard University graduate who has spent 15 years in Washington, D.C. compares Black life at-present in the once and forever Chocolate City to another exciting artistic era.

”Because taking ownership and having pride in one’s Black identity is resurgent in America, Black journalism is beyond essential in uniquely conveying that message to the world.”

This age of awakening is similar to the Harlem Renaissance,” Claudia continues. “Self-determined and community-minded Black people are doing noteworthy things! They’re entrepreneurs and taking steps to create generational wealth for their families.”

Pausing between thoughts, she continues, “These stories are best when told by Black voices. Typically, people that look like you, on some level, understand your plight.

Regarding her thoughts about a year that has seen the Bridge grow in popularity, she’s not stunned by the brand’s surge in acclaim. “WI Bridge deserves to be a serious editorial publication that is befitting being aligned with the Washington Informer, one of America’s oldest and most respected Black newspapers.

Considering 2021, Claudia Watts, though excited, keeps her thoughts succinct.

“WI Bridge is in the business of authentically relaying truthful stories that empower Black bodies, minds, voices, and hearts. We do so with a keen awareness of focusing on the mix of strength and spirituality required to allow Black people’s best selves to emerge. I want to elevate the stories that allow the Bridge to add value to D.C. arts and culture, but Black culture, overall, worldwide.

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